Bricolage is a podcast for makers, made in the united kingdom by dominic morow with new episodes more or less every week!

Hackerspace Architect: Road Map

Hackerspace Architect: Road Map

First off, a clarification. These ideas about “essential tools” haven’t explicitly been tested. They’re theoretical. They’re also works in progress. I’d very much like to test them out. They are of course based on my experience of hackerspaces and how I think they might be better run. I also want to make it very clear that I am writing about a shared space. Some of the ideas might not feel right to you if you have a one-to-one relationship to a hackerspace. That probably means you aren’t spending that much time thinking about how the many rather than the few can get the most out of the resource.

So the road map, the road map is basically a written plan. it can be a sort of rough plan of the route your hackerspace will take to get from starting to somewhere else. The basic idea is that you dream up all the things you want in and for your space and plan it out on the road map. You resist the temptation to say, we’ll have anything we’re offered, or ALL THE TOOLS. You need to consider carefully what is and is not going to be part of your space. You can make this a 6 month plan or a 60 year plan, it doesn’t matter its up to you. You can plan out the next 10 years if you want and you can review it (that means keep it 100% the same or change it totally 100%) every week if you want. Though the better publicised how and more proscriptive engagement with the plan is, the better, especially as the number of members able to influence it increases. It can be one big plan or 8 little plans. It can be managed by you or it can be managed by those responsible for a specific area.

What goes on this road map? Well you can go wild. If you want a space station and an orbital rocket launching site, put it on the plan. If you want a dark room, put it on the plan. If you want woodworking, put it on the plan. Once you’ve worked out all the stuff you want, you can break it down a bit. You can cost it up and you can even put a time scale on it. You can work out also what compromises you are prepared to make. Like, if you can get an old Space Shuttle for free if that’s close enough to get you to the space station or if the repairs and other equipment needed to run it make that a bad choice, even though at face value it feels like a good choice to get you to space.

I know this post doesn’t make a lot of sense. But I’m ill.

today’s thumbnail is key rings at the lego store.

Why did I stop blogging?

Why did I stop blogging?

Hackerspace Architect: Planogram

Hackerspace Architect: Planogram